Salmon swamping canoes. Whales as far as you could see. So many cod a ship couldn’t move. Just a few 100 years ago.

Salmon swamping canoes. Whales as far as you could see. So many cod a ship couldn’t move. Just a few 100 years ago.

Too long ago?

Since 1970 the planet has lost 60% of its land animals. More recently the number of insects is down 60x. The planet is dying.

The Insect Apocalypse Is Here

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48 Responses to Salmon swamping canoes. Whales as far as you could see. So many cod a ship couldn’t move. Just a few 100 years ago.

  1. Nila Jones says:

    flocks of birds that made the sky dark at midday.

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  2. Nila Jones says:

    I’m so scared to grow old. I don’t have kids or much family. I don’t know what the world is going to be like.

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  3. Human society is doomed. The question is, how soon, and how badly. I’m selfish enough to say that I hope it’ll be fifty plus years away (I’m 43 now.)

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  4. …perhaps I’m odd..but at a half century now, I realize there is nothing I can do to halt or slow this horrible destruction…tho I really wish I could. I find myself feeling sorry for the kids of the next generations..what all they will be missing out on…

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  5. Andrew Fisk says:

    Stuart Lamble Unfortunately we will figure out how to stop aging in another 25 years, so you will be 68 and stuck for eternity in a doomed society!

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  6. Andrew Fisk, there’s always the option my brother took. But I very much doubt it’ll come to that; if immortality becomes a thing, there’s the incentive for humanity to figure it out, tout suite.

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  7. Andrew Fisk says:

    Stuart Lamble I’m sure there will be shiny cities in the sky for those that can afford it, but you and I will be working in the oxygen generation plants or feeding the yeast vats or worse!

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  8. Cindy Brown says:

    Violante de Rojas That’s about where I’m at. I’m 53. Will I live to see all of this? Unlikely. But my niblings who are only recently teenagers? Their children — if they have any? 🙁 I do what I can in living & voting and social participation, but …

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  9. Sometimes I feel bad about having a kid; I worry about how she’ll do in the shithole Earth we’re running headlong toward.

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  10. Andrew Fisk says:

    My earlier cynicism aside, humans have managed to survive some fairly some fairly inhospitable places and climates, and while I’m figuring that trips to the Jersey Shore might no longer involve crossing the Delaware and maybe we will figure out the desert living in the south west is really not very smart, we will have enough time to adapt to those changes. If a man can make it through an ice age with fire and flint tools. I have to think we will maintain enough technology to allow our children and grandchildren to live what they will consider a “normal” life.

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  11. Nila Jones says:

    some people, yes. but some of our children and grandchildren will get killed in the floods and fires and what not

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  12. Mass migration is going to be a thing (and I mean mass, not the piddly little amounts we have now), as are the water wars.

    I’m 39 and have no children… and I rarely have an optimistic enough view of the future to want any.

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  13. Humanity will survive. But how many of us will die in making the transition to the new world of higher temperatures, more extreme weather conditions, &c? Granted that we need to reduce our population, but the way we’re going, it’ll be done in one of the most drastic ways imaginable.

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  14. Well, it looks like mosquitoes are doing just fine in all this climate change. There’s that, at least…. ><

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  15. Stuart Lamble as we always end up doing.

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  16. Charles Moore no, they really aren’t.

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  17. Cindy Brown says:

    Stuart Lamble I’m not entirely sure humanity will survive. Previous difficulties did not also include mass die offs of entire parts of the ecosystem; we abandoned those places that did. None of us living now will probably know for sure, unless we hit a tipping point and proceed with things at an exponential scale.

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  18. Cindy Brown my gut feeling says humanity yes, technological society no. Humans are a lot like cockroaches.

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  19. Cindy Brown says:

    Technological society definitely a goner, which makes me cry for the women in those years.

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  20. Andrew Fisk says:

    Cindy Brown you don’t think we could adopt a more sustainable life style without regressing to Victorian morals?

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  21. Cindy Brown says:

    I am pessimistic that a non-technological society will include education and birth control for women. I would dearly love to be proven wrong.

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  22. I’m settling for hoping that we never need to find out. Because I fear that the pessimism is not unfounded.

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  23. The pill, probably not. Takes too much tech. IUDs on the other hand, those really don’t.

    Andrew Fisk and no, I don’t think we could regress without regressing. Not today, anyway, because you know damn well that in many respects it’s a veneer. After two or three more generations, maybe. I can’t really predict that very well. And given history, morality is a lot more changeable than the status of women. Women have had different amounts of legal autonomy and status over the centuries and in different locations, but full equality is still a very new idea. It’s been less than a century since women have the vote in a majority of countries.

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  24. Nila Jones says:

    Oh, God, Jasper Janssen, that’s not true at all! IUDs absolutely depend on having access to hospitals and modern medicine. The infections don’t happen to everyone, but they can happen to anyone at any time and they are life threatening.

    Much more practical for non industrial society is just don’t have PIV sex except in special circumstances. Have other kinds of sex instead.

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  25. Nila Jones so do pregnancies. A significant complication rate is not a bar to using it.

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  26. IUD’s are the worst. One would be better stuffing wadding to block the sperm…an IUD is needing a Dr or specialist to place it, or remove it, and there is always the chance of infections/Pelvic Inflammation due to the removal strand left behind. Not recommended at all.

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  27. Andrew Fisk says:

    You know that contraception is not that hard, as long as you can grow a rubber tree or raise lambs.

    If the one of the issues that we face is the need to reduce population, you would think that we would make contraception a priority, do we need pharmaceutical “factories” to make the pill or antibiotics? I would think that smaller scale, local production would become a goal for a new society.

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  28. Cindy Brown says:

    Men, men, men. Stop a moment and reflect that the women here are pointing out how terribly difficult reproductive control and health is under these circumstances and men are breezing through and saying NAH BRO EASY PEASY.

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  29. Cindy Brown , WELL ACTUALLY.

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  30. Another birth control method that’s so easy humanity has been doing it for thousands of years? Castration. I’m just saying…
    en.wikipedia.org – Castration – Wikipedia

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  31. Andrew Fisk says:

    Cindy Brown not that there is anything I can do to change the final responsibility, but it’s really not that hard for a man to make sure that there are no unintended consequences (been there, done that). Rubbers are cheap, low tech and readily available, and were available before we had our current industrial society.

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  32. Andrew Fisk says:

    Charles Moore you know there is a somewhat less drastic solution that has achieves population control without giving up on all the fun.

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  33. Andrew Fisk it was a direct reply to all the man-splaining in this post. I feel like we should do a better job of not being that guy.

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  34. Cindy Brown says:

    Andrew Fisk And history shows how many men will care.

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  35. Andrew Fisk says:

    Cindy Brown too true, although in our dystopian future, I’m hoping we will fix that.

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  36. Cindy Brown I certainly wasn’t saying “easy peasy”, and I don’t think anyone else was either. I was saying “slightly less awful than getting pregnant under prehistoric conditions”. I mean, it’s gonna kill you before thirty either way. Just like it’ll do to the men, for that matter.

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  37. Andrew Fisk reusable rubber condoms were first produced in 1855. Latex condoms in 1920. In no way are they at all low tech, cheap, readily available, or available before industrial society. Lamb skins, arguably, but that’s a very very different product, even though it goes around the same body part.

    What I’m envisioning is something like the situation after an earthquake or hurricane, but instead of sending aid from places where they didn’t hit to rebuild, it’s all over the world simultaneously so you have to bootstrap from essentially Robinson Crusoe level.

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  38. Andrew Fisk says:

    Jasper Janssen yeah, I had visions of an more gradual (d)evolution to a more agrarian, less industrial world, with the population shrinking to fit into remaining habitable bits of earth. Think Pern rather than Terminator. And no, you probably won’t be turning out millions of shrink wrapped disposable rubbers at Jasper’s custom condoms, but I’m sure you could have a nice sideline to your tire and rubber business with your bespoke covers, makes a great wedding gift!

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  39. Lamb skin condoms aren’t useless; they do prevent sperm from fertilising the egg, and they’d have significant value in a non-industrial society from this perspective alone. But they are sufficiently porous that STIs remain a concern for their users.

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  40. Andrew Fisk says:

    Stuart Lamble not great if you are dating a vegetarian either 🙂

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  41. Andrew Fisk, imagine the fun of dating a vegan who’s also allergic to latex…

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  42. Nila Jones says:

    Jasper Janssen You are shockingly ignorant for someone who asserts his opinion so confidently.

    Pre-industrial people don’t die at age 30. A life expectancy of 30 means that half the kids die before they are one year old and the rest of the people live to be 60. Roughly.

    In highly misogynist societies, women do frequently die in childbirth. Not usually with their first birth or their fifth. Usually with their 10th or 20th.

    Of course women only have that many kids when they don’t have a choice about what types of sex they engage in. In other words, marital rape.

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  43. Nila Jones pre industrial people didn’t die at thirty. We were talking about post apocalyptic. That’s not the same thing.

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  44. Cindy Brown says:

    Pretty sure that whatever kills men off by 30 in post apocalyptic world will take its share of the women too.

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  45. Nila Jones says:

    okay, I’ll bite. where are you getting this 30 years old thing, then?

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  46. Andrew Fisk says:

    Cindy Brown Unless it’s the women killing them off 🙂

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