OH FOR FUCKS SAKE

OH FOR FUCKS SAKE

Al Roker defends dressing as white character for Halloween

Al Roker was criticized for dressing as a white character. He had to explain why that’s not the same thing

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0 Responses to OH FOR FUCKS SAKE

  1. Jim Douglas says:

    Anyone complaining about that is either an idiot or is intentionally trying to promote a false equivalency. There’s a lot of that going around right now.

    vox.com – Trump: the media never blamed Obama for the Charleston church shooting

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  2. Dan Thompson says:

    I listened to a great podcast last year on “Black Cosplay”, talking about the issues of blacks cosplaying non-black characters as well as non-blacks cosplaying black characters. I’ve linked to it from one of my Podcast posts:

    plus.google.com – Imaginary Worlds: 28 Days of Black Cosplay This episode examines the world o…

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  3. John Hattan says:

    So if a three year-old black kid trick-or-treats at my house dressed as Batman, I should get upset about it. Gotcha.

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  4. Lisa Chabot says:

    Kimberlyn Reed regularly posts a lot of black cosplay on G+: it’s all awesome.
    On FB, one of my more conservative friends (from college) posted something and the one reply triggered a Poe’s Law reaction in me: I honestly could not tell if the guy was parodying outrage at the idea of Idris Elba as James Bond or what. (Frankly, I loved Jeffrey Wright as Felix Leiter, and could care less he doesn’t match Fleming’s depiction, just like pretty much nobody objected to Sean Connery, who also didn’t match.)
    Is it that people have lazy minds, or are just incredibly racist? I look at what an actor brings to a role, or a cosplayer does with the concept.

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  5. Scott Gomez says:

    Another right-wingnut created tempest in a teapot.

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  6. After all, the 1980s mainstream media landscape is so full of black characters to cosplay as. Dr Huxtable, and… err…. Archie Bunker’s black neighbor, and….. err….. ….

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  7. Oh FFS. How is this even a thing?

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  8. You know, I’m not one to listen to the stupidity coming out the right wing ass about the media being the enemy of the people, but I do agree the media is somewhat responsible for the division in this country. I can’t fathom why they thought it was necessary to share this idiots twitter post about his ignorant and stupid statement. He is now gaining attention he doesn’t deserve and CNN is to blame for that.

    Why did they decide to make this a story at all? The guys response to the first comment on his post was a joke about that persons mom. Ignorance and childishness is a way of life for this person. I don’t even think Roker should have responded at all. What a waste of time this story in particular is lending attention to a useless troll online.

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  9. Andres Soolo says:

    John Hattan: Well, clearly he’s appropriating the culture of Bat Americans.

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  10. He didn’t do it in white-face. That’s the difference.

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  11. If you please, Andres Soolo, it’s Chiropteran American…

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  12. John Hattan says:

    Sorry kid, you can’t be Batman, Superman, Wonder Woman, Spiderman, or The Hulk.

    You have to be Black Panther or that girl who announces the Quiddich scores in the Harry Potter movies.

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  13. John Hattan but only in the movies, not in the books.

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  14. Lisa Chabot says:

    Dean Thomas is black in Harry Potter, both books and movies.

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  15. Cindy Brown says:

    Theater production of the Cursed Child has a black Hermione

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  16. It does, that is true.

    You know how something can be so mistaken in so many different directions that you just end up sort of at a loss for which part of the ball of string you should pull on first? That’s how I feel about this noise. Like, dressing as a character of another race, that is not the same as blackface. Blackface is a specific thing with a specific history. It is offensive because of its history. That’s one string…

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  17. Another is the very short list of black characters in popular culture, that’s another string.

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  18. Andres Soolo says:

    James Coleman: No, it is not. Outside a ridiculous false equivalency narrative, there’s nothing wrong with him wearing a mime makeup or painting his face pink.

    White people have not been subject to an extensive, nefarious, oppressive racial vaudeville mockery. White people have had the privilege to be mostly mocked for non-racial things about them. A black person walking around with a light facepaint does not invoke oppression the same way a white person walking around with insensitively done black facepaint can.

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  19. Andres Soolo then again, countries outside the US, with a lot less history of oppression, at least inside the borders, (and for that matter, less though not no history of minstrel shows)…

    en.m.wikipedia.org – Zwarte Piet – Wikipedia

    (And yes, that is controversial around here, these days)

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  20. Andres Soolo says:

    Jasper Janssen: AFAIU, much of the controversy is just Americans misunderstanding a local tradition. They’re the same kind of people who insist on calling dark-skinned Brits ‘Afro-Americans’.

    This kind of stereotypes need not be hostile, and I think Europe is well on its way towards converting them into friendly silly things, kind of like depicting Scots as wearing skirts, or Austrians as blowing oversized horns, or French as swinging baguettes around. Of course, some basic sensitivity is highly advisable around such things.

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  21. Andres Soolo yeah, that’s not really true, the controversy originated with our local darker skinned community and occasionally the yanks grab onto it from elsewhere.

    Even when I was a kid in the 80s, the standard explanation was that his face was black because he was going up and down chimneys delivering presents. But look at that picture in the Wikipedia page. That’s not someone sporting a bad cockney accent traipsing over the roofs of London — it’s clearly blackface.

    The compromise most people seem to accept on both sides is to actually make them up as more or less chimneysweeps.

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  22. I understood James Coleman’s comment to say that Al Roker didn’t do whiteface, because whiteface is not an actual thing. Unlike blackface. Blackface has a long history of being used to denigrate and demean people. Whiteface isn’t even something that people do, it has no commensurate history. Someone might white out his face to make a comment on that, but Roker didn’t even do that. So maybe I understood his comment incorrectly but that’s how I read it.

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  23. Andres Soolo says:

    Jasper Janssen: It’s an old ethnic stereotype about black people, developed in times when news travelled slowly, television had not yet been invented, and black people were considered exotic in European countryside. Russians have, at times, held somewhat similar ideas about Pushkin’s grandfather and later about the students of the Lumumba university in Moscow. Unlike blackface, it’s not inherently hateful, although racists can sometimes hook hate into such stereotypes, and it’s still sensitive, in that some black people taking offence is not exactly unreasonable and sensible people will then try to not offend them.

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  24. Andres Soolo says:

    Donna Buckles: Actually, whiteface is a thing, although it has nothing to do with blackface or racism. It’s a clowning discipline derived from the mediaeval traditions of commedia dell’arte. I’m not entirely sure, but I suspect the stereotypical French mimes tend to wear white makeup in reference to this tradition; in this context, it has a clear theatrical purpose, in that it brings the mime’s facial movements to sharp contrast.

    Incidentally, French racism works subtly differently from classic European racism, in that the French, by and large, have been quite accepting of French citizens who happened to have dark skin for several centuries — even though they didn’t see much wrong with waging colonial wars, to a significant degree motivated by racist ideas, against dark-skinned people who just happened to not be French citizens.

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  25. Yes in that sense white makeup is a thing. As is white makeup on geisha and certain characters in Japanese drama. Also metal bands. Also masks in many contexts. Certain ritual costumes in Pueblo cultures. But none of that is whiteface as an equivalent to blackface.

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  26. Andres Soolo says:

    Donna Buckles: As far as I know, of these, only the clowning concept is actually known as ‘whiteface’.

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